Tag Archives: judgment

The Fig Tree and God’s Coming Wrath

Parable of the withered fig tree

🔥 “Now in the morning, as He returned to the city, He was hungry. And seeing a fig tree by the road, He came to it and FOUND NOTHING ON IT BUT LEAVES, and said to it, “Let no fruit grow on you ever again.” Immediately the fig tree withered away. And when the disciples saw it, they marveled, saying, “How did the fig tree wither away so soon?” So Jesus answered and said to them, “Assuredly, I say to you, if you have faith and do not doubt, you will not only do what was done to the fig tree, but also if you say to this mountain, ‘Be removed and be cast into the sea,’ it will be done. And WHATEVER THINGS YOU ASK IN PRAYER, BELIEVING, YOU WILL RECEIVE.” ~ Matthew 21:18-22

Some of the more misunderstood verses in the Bible center squarely this section of multi-layered teachings: the cursing of the fig tree; moving mountains and the misapplication of “prayer and believing”.

The key to properly understanding and applying this section of verses requires the need for CONTEXT:

  • The FIG TREE had only leaves on it but bore no fruit! This is very similar to the “Parable of Sower”; specifically, the tree that bore leaves but, under the scorching sun – withered and died. (see Matthew 13)
  • The FAITH WITHOUT DOUBTING refers to faith that leads to salvation thru the finished work of Jesus the Christ on the cross for payment of our sins! Without that faith, it is impossible to please God! (see Hebrews 11:5-6)
  • The MOUNTAIN is not about life’s circumstances and your wants generally but rather, the specific problem that is YOUR SIN! Unless your faith rest squarely in the hope that Jesus alone can remove sin’s condemnation and consequences – you will be judged wanting and cast into the fire (just as the withered fig tree died)!
  • The PRAYER AND BELIEVING and RECEIVING refers to the Gospel of the Good News of Jesus Christ! You MUST repent and believe (see Mark 1:15).
  • The promise of BELIEVING AND YOU WILL RECEIVE is about God forgiving your sin, removing your condemnation and then, becoming alive in Jesus by the Spirit. You MUST be born twice by God the Spirit regenerating you or you will NEVER see God the Father (see John 3:3)

Conclusion:

  • Don’t be the fig tree without fruit on it vine – His judgement of that “dead” tree was quick and immediate and so is His coming judgment of this world also! (see Romans 2:6)

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.” ~ John 3:16-17 💕

The Everlasting Mercy of God

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“O give thanks unto the LORD; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.” (Psalm 136:1)

God’s mercy is a monumental theme in Scripture. The English word appears some 341 times in the Bible. The four Hebrew and three Greek words appear a total of 454 times and are also translated by “kindness,” “lovingkindness,” “goodness,” “favor,” “compassion,” and “pity.” Of the 66 books of the Bible, only 16 do not use one of the words for mercy.

Even though “mercy” is an important concept, it is somewhat difficult to prescribe a definition for it, especially since “grace” is occasionally coupled with it.

In the first reference where “mercy” is used, Lot has just been expelled from Sodom by the angels of judgment. In spite of the command by the angels that Lot and his daughters “escape to the mountain,” Lot begs: “Oh, not so, my Lord: Behold now, thy servant hath found grace in thy sight, and thou hast magnified thy mercy, which thou hast shewed unto me in saving my life, . . . this city is near . . . Oh, let me escape thither” (Genesis 19:17-20). And later, the New Testament saints are told to “come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:16). In these and other such passages, the two terms appear to address similar subjects.

However similar they may appear to be, these words are not synonyms. “Grace” is most often associated with the sovereign dispensation of totally undeserved favor, and it is specifically connected to salvation. “Mercy” is more often connected to the withholding of judgment: “For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath shewed no mercy; and mercy rejoiceth against judgment” (James 2:13).

Set aside some time today to read and meditate on this psalm. You will find the day less wearisome if you do. HMM III

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